Louisiana Book News by Cheré Dastugue Coen

Published Sundays in The Daily Advertiser of Lafayette and Monroe News Star of Monroe.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Chris Segura, Michael Martin discuss 'History of Cajun Music' at Jeanerette Museum

     The Jeanerette Bicentennial Museum presents “A Journey through the History of Cajun Music” at 6 p.m. tonight at the Jeanerette Museum located at 500 E. Main St. in Jeanerette.
      The event will incorporate archival recordings from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette’s Center for Louisiana Studies’ Archive of Cajun and Creole Folklore and include a live performance. Chris Segura and Michael Martin will discuss the history of Cajun music from the earliest examples to the most recent innovations. 
      Segura is an archivist at UL and is a founding member of Grammy-nominated Feufollet as well as a member of the Lafayette Rhythm Devils. He has recorded 10 albums with his two bands, plus produced five albums composed of archive material for Festivals Acadiens et Creoles. 
      Martin is director of the Center for Louisiana Studies and holds the Cheryl Courrégé Burguières/Board of Regents Professorship in History at UL. His publications include “Russell Long: A Life in Politics,” “Louisiana Legacies: Readings in the History of the Pelican State” (as co-editor), “Louisiana Beyond Black and White: Recent Interpretations of Twentieth-Century Race and Race Relations” (as editor) and “Historic Lafayette.” Martin is managing editor of the journal “Louisiana History,” published quarterly by the Louisiana Historical Association 

       The event is free at the Jeanerette Museum, 500 E. Main St. in Jeanerette. For more information, visit JeaneretteMuseum.com.


Nov. 1's Louisiana Book Festival to provide programs, author events for children and teens

            The Louisiana Book Festival on Saturday, Nov. 1, will offer programs for children and teens at the Young Readers Pavilion and the Teen HQ. 
            The Young Readers Pavilion will host children’s authors such as Whitney Stewart, author of “A Catfish Tale: A Bayou Story of the Fisherman and His Wife,” which was chosen to represent Louisiana at the National Book Festival and John Grandits, winner of the 2014 Young Readers’ Choice Award for his book “Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break If You Want to Survive the School Bus.”
            Temporary tattoos, storytelling and book-related crafts and activities will also be offered in the Pavilion. Storybook characters Mittens, Lyle the Crocodile, Alice from Alice in Wonderland and Snow White from Grimm’s Fairy Tales will be available for pictures and autographs.
            In a related note, Cokie Roberts, author of “Founding Mothers: Remembering theLadies,” highlighting the women patriots of the American Revolution for ages 7-12, will speak at 10 a.m. in the Senate Chamber.
            Brain Quest will bring its curriculum-based question and answer game to life with Brain Quest Challenges throughout the day. Children ages 5 to 12 are encouraged to play and compete individually or as a team. All participants receive giveaways while they last and official challenge participation certificates.
            Teen HQ will feature author presentations, crafts, trivia, raffles and a scavenger hunt for teenagers. Kendare Blake will receive the 2014 Louisiana Teen Readers’ Choice Honor Book award for “Anna Dressed in Blood.” Jennifer Anne Moses, author of “Tales from My Closet,” and Kristin O’Donnell Tubb, author of “13th Sign,” will be among the many young adult authors at this year’s Book Festival.
              The festival will be held inside and on the grounds of the Louisiana State Capitol, the Louisiana State Library and the Louisiana State Museum in Baton Rouge.

            For more information or to sign up to volunteer visit LouisianaBookFestival.org. Also look for festival updates on Facebook and Twitter.

Cheré Coen is the author of “Forest Hill, Louisiana: A Bloom Town History,” Haunted Lafayette, Louisiana” and “Exploring Cajun Country: A Historic Guide to Acadiana” and co-author of “Magic’s in the Bag: Creating Spellbinding Gris Gris Bags and Sachets.” Write her at cherecoen@gmail.com.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Ann Dobie's new book 'Remembering Lafayette,' plus more historical new releases

            Ann B. Dobie, professor emerita of English at UL-Lafayette, has published a slice of Lafayette history in “Remembering Lafayette: 1930-1955.” The book covers the pre-war and war years, development of education and the university, local businesses such as Heymann’s department store, entertainment and making a living, to name only a few of her topics. She chose this period because of the town’s growth and “transformation,” caused by post-war prosperity and oil development.
            “‘Remembering Lafayette’ tells the stories of those changes, stories of how people lived and worked and had fun as the small Cajun town grew into one of the largest and most affluent cities in the state,” Dobie writes in the book’s introduction.
            The book contains memories of long-time residents, numerous photographs and a foreword by Mayor Joey Durel and is available at Champagne’s Grocery in the Oil Center, Vermilionville and Little Veron’s grocery store.

New releases
            The Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival announced the publication of “Luxury, Inequity & Yellow Fever: Living Legacies and the Story of Old New Orleans” by photographer and New Orleans native Kerri McCaffety, released by their sponsor, the Hermann-Grima and Gallier historic houses. The book pairs 152 pages of photographs of both homes’ parlors and bedrooms with historical accounts, giving insight into antebellum New Orleans — a time of wealth, romance, slavery, hurricanes and disease. The book is available at the Exchange Shop at the Hermann-Grima House, independent area bookstores and Barnes & Noble. For more information, visit http://www.hgghh.org.
            Two books on New Orleans by Pelican Publishing include “New Orleans Hurricanes From the Start” by David F. Bastian and Nicholas J. Meis, a look at the Crescent City’s long history of storms and lessons learned, and “Hell and High Water: The Battle to Save the Daily New Orleans Times-Picayune” by Rebecca Theim, a former staff writer.
            Carol Mills-Nichols discovered in 1999 that she was Jewish and has been studying Jewish families of the Gulf South for the past 15 years. She follows up “The Forgotten Jews of Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana” with “Louisiana’s Jewish Immigrants from the Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.” The book includes biographies of 638 immigrants to Louisiana who left from places in the Bas-Rhin, Alsace region of France. The book is available online and through the publisher, Janaway Publishing, Inc.
            In conjunction with the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, The Historic New Orleans Collection is releasing a book chronicling the history of an independent troop of cavalrymen from New Orleans titled “A Fine Body of Men: The Orleans Light Horse, Louisiana Cavalry, 1861–1865” by Donald Peter Moriarty. The author follows the Orleans Light Horse from its organization in February 1861 through its March 1862 muster into active service with the Confederate States Army to the war’s end in 1865. As the escort company to Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk and later Lt. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, the Orleans Light Horse was an integral part of the Army of Mississippi and the Army of Tennessee. 
             O’Neil de Noux of New Orleans has published “The French Detective,” a novel that takes place in 1900 New Orleans in which a young Sicilian-American boy is kidnapped and the crime offers no leads. NOPD Detective Jacques Dugas is pitted against a crime boss and a terrifying henchman and hindered by lingering animosity between police and Sicilians along with violent confrontations between police and black citizens as the dreaded Jim Crow Laws go into effect. The book is available from Amazon.com.

Bridge to Publication
            The Bayou Writers Group will host its annual conference Saturday, Nov. 8, at the Safe Harbor center of the University United Methodist Church, 3501 Patrick St. in Lake Charles. Titled “A Bridge to Publication,” the conference will address topics ranging from what social media can do for writers to the author-publisher relationship. Attendees will also have the chance to pitch their works to editors and agents and attend a special Q&A panel on what writers need to know after they have been published. Poetry and fiction written by the Bayou Writers Group will be available in “Gator Bites” on site and participants will have the opportunity to compete or vote in the “Best First Page Contest.” For more information and to register, visit http://bayouwritersgroup.com.

Cajun music history
            The Jeanerette Bicentennial Museum presents “A Journey through the History of Cajun Music” at 6 p.m. Wednesday, incorporating archival recordings from UL’s Center for Louisiana Studies’ Archive of Cajun and Creole Folklore and including a live performance. Chris Segura and Michael Martin will discuss the history of Cajun music from the earliest examples to the most recent innovations. 
            Segura is an archivist at UL and founding member of the Grammy-nominated Feu Follet as well as a member of the Lafayette Rhythm Devils. He has recorded 10 albums with his two bands, plus produced five albums composed of archive material for Festivals Acadiens et Créoles.
            Martin is director of the Center for Louisiana Studies and holds the Cheryl Courrégé Burguières/Board of Regents Professorship in History at UL. His publications include “Russell Long: A Life in Politics,” “Louisiana Legacies: Readings in the History of the Pelican State” (as co-editor), “Louisiana Beyond Black and White: Recent Interpretations of Twentieth-Century Race and Race Relations” (as editor) and “Historic Lafayette.” Martin is managing editor of the journal “Louisiana History,” published quarterly by the Louisiana Historical Association.
            The event is free at the Jeanerette Museum, 500 E. Main St. in Jeanerette. For more information, visit JeaneretteMuseum.com.

Book events
            Michael Rubin will be signing copies of his novel, “The Cottoncrest Curse,” from noon to 2 p.m. at the LSU Barnes & Noble in Baton Rouge. The signing time may change according to the kickoff of the LSU v. Ole Miss game.
            Poetry Slam and open mic by UL’s Powerful Poets begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Black’s Café, 518 S Pierce St. Cost is $5. For information, contact PoeticSoul337@gmail.com.
            Ben Wynne will be speaking and signing “In Tune: Charley Patton, Jimmie Rodgers,and the Roots of American Music” from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Lorelei Books, 1103 S. Washington St. in Vicksburg and at 5 p.m. Friday at Lemuria Books in Jackson, Miss.
            There will be a book discussion of “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman” at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at South Regional Library. In honor of the 40th anniversary of the movie by the same name, Dr. Matthew Teutsch, interim director of the Ernest J. Gaines Center, will lead a discussion about Gaines’ most popular novel and its cultural significance.
            James Wade will be speaking on his new book, The Pitot House:A Landmark on Bayou St. John," at the Louisiana Landmarks Society event from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at the East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave. in Metairie.
             James Nolan signs “You Don’t Know Me: New and Selected Stories” at 6 p.m. Thursday at Octavia Books in New Orleans.
            Andi Eaton signs copies of “New Orleans Style” from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Costco in New Orleans.
            Addie K. Martin and Jeremy Martin sign copies of “Southeast Louisiana Food: A Seasoned Tradition” at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Maple Street Books in New Orleans and at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the French Food Festival.


Thursday, October 16, 2014

Recent booksigning brought together amazing authors

Celeste
and Matthew Goodwin
            Booksignings are not my favorite thing to do.
            I love meeting readers, bookstores remain the ideal place to sit and relax (don't you love being surrounded by books?) and I always indulge in those delicious caffeinated drinks.
            But for those of us who are more introverted, hawking books to strangers can be intimidating.
            Recently, I was part of an “Author Expo” at the Lafayette (Louisiana) Barnes & Noble so I enjoyed company. And what impressive company it was!
Ed Reed, left,
and Dianne Alexander, right,
            University of Louisiana at Lafayette history professor Michael Martin, who heads up the Center for Louisiana Studies, was signing “Russell Long: A Life in Politics” next to Alan Gautreaux, author of “Italian Louisiana: History, Heritage and Tradition,” a fascinating look at one of the largest ethnic groups of the Big Easy.
            Edward Reed has just released his insightful memoir, “I Remember When” and Donna McGee Onebane had her family and friends on hand for her launch of “The House the Sugarcane Built: The Louisiana Burguieres.”
Donna McGee Onebane
with family and friends.
            Rosemary Smith has penned several children books starring an adorable lizard named Lizzy, while Dr. David J. Barczyk, a Lafayette chiropractor and CEO of All !N Wellness, hoped to spread his health gospel with “Wellness Wake Up Call.”
Chere Coen
            I had the pleasure of sitting net to Diane Alexander, the only survivor of the Derrick Todd Lee mass murders. This spiritual woman chalks up her miraculous rescue (her son arrived home in time to save her) to God in “Divine Justice: The Dianne Alexander Story.” Likewise, Celeste Goodwin recounts her son’s miraculous recovery from a tragic episode due to high blood pressure in “A Boy Back from Heaven.” Her son Matthew returned from a near-death experience with a new perspective on life and told his parents, at a very young age, what they believed to be heaven. And Angela Cortello published her inspirational book in an effort to help others, titled “Angel: The True Story of an Underserved Chance.”
             What impressive company! I take it back, I love booksignings.
             If you're in Lafayette this weekend, I'll be at the Lafayette Barnes and Noble from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, dressed in Halloween gear (I'm being brave) in honor of my "Haunted Lafayette, Louisiana" book and my latest titled, "Forest Hill, Louisiana: A Bloom Town History." Please come out and say hi.
            Note: Celeste Goodwin is the founder of the Baton Rouge based nonprofit, National Pediatric Blood Pressure Awareness Foundation, which advocates educating the need for blood pressure screening in children.

Cookbook Tuesday: New Orleans cuisine in a slow cooker

            I’m all about easy when it comes to cooking but I hail from New Orleans and live in Lafayette, surrounding by the best food imaginable, so ordinary meals don’t fit my bill. That’s why I was excited to see “In a While, Crocodile: New Orleans Slow Cooker Recipes” by sisters Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, a collection of recipes you can add to the slow cooker and let it do its magic, then return to a delicious meal that live up to Louisiana standards.
            The book is published by Pelican Publishing out of New Orleans and includes recipes that include barbecue shrimp, cochon de lait with beef broth (recipe below), mock turtle soup, grits and grillades and bananas foster.
            Clocking in at $21.95 (less online and from the publisher), “In a While, Crocodile” also makes a great holiday gift.

Mais Oui Cochon de Lait
1 4-5 pound pork butt
6 cloves garlic, whole
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 teaspoon coriander
1 12-ounce can beer
1 12-ounce can beef broth
            Directions: Cut 6 evenly spaced slits in top of pork butt and insert a garlic clove into each slit. Place pork butt in the slow cooker.
            Spread mustard over the top of the meat.
            In a separate bowl, combine chili powder, pepper, and coriander. Sprinkle spice mixture evenly over the top of the meat.
            Pour beer around the pork, not over the top. Add enough beef broth to bring the liquid near the top of the pork, but do not cover.

            Cook on low heat for 6-8 hours or until pork falls apart.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Wade's book on Pitot House out in time for anniversary

            Bayou St. John curving through New Orleans near City Park used to be a major sources for transportation to the colonial city. In 1708 Antoine Rivard de Lavigne built a house on the bayou, and James Pitot purchased the architecturally significant home in 1804. In 1964, the house was in danger of demolition and the Louisiana Landmarks Society moved the Pitot House and restored it. The Society will celebrate this 50th anniversary with a gala on Nov. 6.
            To get a sense of the history of this magnificent house, read the newly released book “The Pitot House: A Landmark on Bayou St. John” by James Wade, a member of the Society’s board of directors, where he is also the correspondence secretary, chair of the publications committee, preservation editor and docent at the Pitot House museum. The book is published by Pelican Publishing out of New Orleans.
            Wade will be speaking at the Louisiana Landmarks Society event (and signing books) from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at the East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave. in Metairie.

            To read a Q and A with the author, click here.

Cheré Coen is the author of “Forest Hill, Louisiana: A Bloom Town History,” “Haunted Lafayette, Louisiana” and “Exploring Cajun Country: A Historic Guide to Acadiana” and co-author of “Magic’s in the Bag: Creating Spellbinding Gris Gris Bags and Sachets.” Write her at cherecoen@gmail.com.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Louisiana Book Festival offers variety of 'Wordshops'



            Time is ticking to register for the five Wordshops hosted by the Louisiana Center for the Book, as part of this year's Louisiana Book Festival. These workshops will be given Friday, Oct. 31, in the State Library of Louisiana in Baton Rouge by Louisiana Book Festival author-instructors Jill McCorkle, Mark Dunn, Ava Leavell Haymon, Barbara Slate and Earl Swift. Topics covered include storytelling, teen-writing, graphic novels, poetry and organizing strategies.
Jill McCorkle
            Fellowship of Southern Writers member Jill McCorkle, author of four story collections and six novels, presents Finding the Story, a fiction workshop focusing on showing and telling the story one has always wanted to write. 
            Mark Dunn, the genre-busting novelist, leads young writers in Breaking the Rules: A Teen Writing Workshop for the Creatively Hyperactive, an exploration of the different non-traditional ways of expressing oneself with language.
Ava Leavell Haymon
            Comic artist Barbara Slate guides attendees on how to write and draw comic books and graphic novels as she presents You Can Do a Graphic Novel.
           Louisiana Poet Laureate Ava Leavell Haymon facilitates novices and experienced participants alike in Making Poems out of Your Own Experience through translating memories into poems. Haymon has published four poetry collections. She also edits the LSU Press Barataria Poetry Series.
            Journalist Earl Swift, author of five books of narrative nonfiction, presents The Lovely Bones: On Organizing Your Research and Writing, offering strategies for organizing field notes, interview transcripts and documentary research. 
            For additional information or to register for WordShops, call (225) 219-9503 or visit LouisianaBookFestival.org/wordshops.html.

Cheré Coen is the author of “Forest Hill, Louisiana: A Bloom Town History,” “Haunted Lafayette, Louisiana” and “Exploring Cajun Country: A Historic Guide to Acadiana” and co-author of “Magic’s in the Bag: Creating Spellbinding Gris Gris Bags and Sachets.” Write her at cherecoen@gmail.com.